Applying for a Job

THE ULTIMATE PERSONAL SELLING EXERCISE

Some facts to consider

  • The interviewer is wanting to buy the future - not the past
  • They want to know that you actually want the job
  • You are invariably up against formidable competition
  • The job is available otherwise they would not be interviewing you

You just need to deliver what they want

SOLUTION?

Use the techniques of personal selling

FIRSTLY - Your CV

  • Present it on folded A5 size booklet
  • Print on high quality lightly tinted paper
  • Include a good head shot photo
  • List the benefits of employing you
  • Discuss your character
  • Make contact details large and easy to find
  • Give them at least 3 copies

SECONDLY - Your WEBSITE

  • Develop a good personal website
  • Have your CV available as a download file
  • Sure, discuss your past achievements ...
  • More importantly … discuss what you can offer
  • Discuss the benefits of employing you
  • Design it for your audience
  • Make it easy to navigate

(for a FREE website see Google Sites)

THIRDLY - Your PREPARATION

  • Research the company
    Research the company’s products and services
    Research the company’s market
    Research the position
    Determine why they are employing

FINALLY - THE INTERVIEW

  • Introduce yourself by saying your first name twice and surname once

   (e.g.  John, John Doe)

  • Then immediately ask the following question…


          WHAT DO I NEED TO DO TO GET THIS JOB?

.... read more below ...

resume

SIMPLE WRITING PRINCIPLES THAT APPLY TO RESUMES.

AVOID THE FIRST PERSON PRONOUN

The pronoun I has no place in a CV - and for a logical reason: Who else would you be talking about if not yourself?

Instead of this:

I demonstrated professionalism, tact, and diplomacy while I worked with our customers in high-pressure situations.

Write this:

Demonstrated professionalism, tact, and diplomacy while working with customers in high-pressure situations.

Instead of this:

I managed a department whose chief responsibility was to oversee safety audits. I wrote all audit reports and conducted management briefings.

Write this:

Managed a department whose chief responsibility was to oversee safety audits. Wrote audit reports and conducted management briefings.

Notice that the second version of each example begins with an action verb. This practice is accepted and recommended in CVs.

KEEP YOUR SENTENCES SHORT AND DON'T WORRY ABOUT FRAGMENTS

CVs call for short, crisp statements. These statements do not necessarily have to be complete sentences; you can frequently leave out the articles a, an, and the.

Instead of this:

Spent three years working on major accounts, as both a lead generator and a closer, demonstrating proven skill in organising and managing a territory with efficiency as well as in developing customer databases.

Write this:

Spent three years working on major accounts. Generated leads and closed sales. Demonstrated proven skill in organising and managing a territory and in developing customer databases.

Instead of this:

I was involved in the creation and implementation of statistical reports for a large city hospital, which required the use of spreadsheet software for cost analysis and, in addition, the creation of a database to track patient visits.

Write this:

Created and implemented statistical reports for large city hospital. Analysed costs with spreadsheet software. Created database to track patient visits.

Or try a bulleted format:

  •     Created and implemented statistical reports for large city hospital.
  •     Analysed costs with spreadsheet software.
  •     Created database to track patient visits.


USE PLAIN ENGLISH

Don't be victimised by the myth that the bigger the word you use, the more impressed the reader will be with your intelligence. Keep things simple. Go easy on the adjectives. And be especially wary of those grammatical constructions known as nominalisations - that is, nouns that are built around verbs and become part of a bulky phrase that can just as easily be expressed in a single word. e.g.


Bulky Phrase                                         Better

Effected the solution of                           Solved
Engaged in the operation of                    Operated
Offered assistance in the facilitation of     Helped facilitate


USE BULLET STATEMENTS WHEN APPROPRIATE

You usually have a choice when you are writing your CV to combine a series of related statements into a single paragraph or to list each sentence in that paragraph as a separate statement, each occupying its own line. There are pros and cons for each option, and sometimes you have to base your decision on the amount of information you need to get across.

Bullet pointed information is more readable and tends to stand out more than the same information contained within a paragraph. But bullet pointed information also takes up more room. Your best bet is to combine the two.

If you decide to express information in bullet pointed style, keep the bullet pointed items brief and pay attention to parallelism. That is, try to make all the items in a sequence adhere to a similar grammatical pattern.

Examples of nonparallel statements include

  • Reconcile all statements for cardholders
  • Purchases are approved
  • Have experience in performing training of tellers



Examples of parallel statements include

  • Reconcile statements
  • Approve purchases for Marketing department
  • Train tellers




GO FROM GENERAL TO SPECIFIC

Sequence the information in a section by beginning with a general statement and following it with more specific ones.

Instead of this:

Supervised training of seven toy-making elves. Responsible for all toy-making and customer-related activities in Santa's workshop. Answered customer complaints during peak season. (Note that the second of these two sentences is more general than the first.)

Write this:

Responsible for all toy-making and customer-related activities in Santa's workshop. Supervised training of seven toy-making elves. Answered customer complaints during peak season.